How To Quit Your Job Without Bridges Burned

Too often today, people get fed up with their jobs and just walk away. They do it in dramatic fashion, they post viral videos, they do everything wrong. When you quit your job, no matter how your method seems right to you, a bridge may be burned. Do not burn your bridges, as you will need references and good tidings down the road. You may not know it from your time at a company, but you may be leaving a bad taste in the mouths of many people that could help you network and more. You may offend a boss that has deep connections beyond what you may see up front. It’s for that notion that you should consider a few tips for quitting your job without burning any bridges or ruining your reputation.

Proper Notice

The standard is two weeks’ notice. However, you should think about offering more than that, and even giving your time to the company to help the next person in line. If you are absolutely fed up with your company, don’t just walk off the job. Plan ahead, and tell your boss that you’re going to be leaving in writing. Then make sure to help the next person, otherwise you will be causing serious strain for the business in your absence.

Say Nothing About The Company

When you leave, say nothing bad about the company. Even if they were the “Evil Empire” to you, don’t say a negative thing. Furthermore, reassure your existing boss that you are not going to bad mouth the company when you are gone. The goal here is to professionally decline your role in the company and walk away without rocking the proverbial boat. Reputation matters, and you should uphold your end with class.

Be Considerate (Transparency)

At the end of the day, you don’t have to reveal anything to your coworkers or bosses. If you don’t want to tell them why you’re leaving, you don’t have to. You can leave things up in the air, but make sure that there is a simple reason. If you want to go into details, you can, but it’s best to not give a long narrative to why you’ve decided you needed a change. You get to choose how you illustrate your departure. Do not feel obligated to tell anyone the loathing you feel for the position etc.

Too often today people get fed up with their jobs and just walk away. They do it in dramatic fashion, they post viral videos, they do everything wrong. When you quit your job, no matter how your method seems right to you, a bridge may be burned. Do not burn your bridges, as you will need references and good tidings down the road. You may not know it from your time at a company, but you may be leaving a bad taste in the mouths of many people that could help you network and more. You may offend a boss that has deep connections beyond what you may see up front. It’s for that notion that you should consider a few tips for quitting your job without burning any bridges or ruining your reputation.

Proper Notice

The standard is two weeks’ notice. However, you should think about offering more than that, and even giving your time to the company to help the next person in line. If you are absolutely fed up with your company, don’t just walk off the job. Plan ahead, and tell your boss that you’re going to be leaving in writing. Then make sure to help the next person, otherwise you will be causing serious strain for the business in your absence.

Say Nothing About The Company

When you leave, say nothing bad about the company. Even if they were the “Evil Empire” to you, don’t say a negative thing. Furthermore, reassure your existing boss that you are not going to bad mouth the company when you are gone. The goal here is to professionally decline your role in the company and walk away without rocking the proverbial boat. Reputation matters, and you should uphold your end with class.

Be Considerate (Transparency)

At the end of the day, you don’t have to reveal anything to your coworkers or bosses. If you don’t want to tell them why you’re leaving, you don’t have to. You can leave things up in the air, but make sure that there is a simple reason. If you want to go into details, you can, but it’s best to not give a long narrative to why you’ve decided you needed a change. You get to choose how you illustrate your departure. Do not feel obligated to tell anyone the loathing you feel for the position etc.

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Jon D Jones

Software Architect, Programmer and Technologist Jon Jones is founder and CEO of London-based tech firm Digital Prompt. He has been working in the field for nearly a decade, specializing in new technologies and technical solution research in the web business. A passionate blogger by heart , speaker & consultant from England.. always on the hunt for the next challenge

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