Top 10 Tips for Developers Writing Their CV's

The world is changing rapidly for many IT professionals. In the past, the emphasis was on finding employment with a large multinational firm and then sticking with it until the end of your working days. That isn't a viable option nowadays, however. Instead, it becomes important for permanent IT workers to try their hand at contracting work so that they can harness the best of both worlds. One key step to landing great contracting work, however, is having an IT CV that really pops. If your CV is strong and has an edge to it, you're giving yourself a huge advantage over other IT professionals who merely prepare mediocre CV's. In order to maximise the potential of your CV, here are ten tips to consider. 1. Focus on your successes and achievements, as opposed to just rattling off a list of certifications, modules, and degrees. You need to keep in mind that potential clients want to hire a winner. They want someone who has a proven track record of taking existing IT problems, and offering solutions that work elegantly and effectively. So you need to highlight those times that you took responsibility for something and carried it to a positive and successful conclusion.

1. Focus on your successes and achievements, as opposed to just rattling off a list of certifications, modules, and degrees. You need to keep in mind that potential clients want to hire a winner. They want someone who has a proven track record of taking existing IT problems, and offering solutions that work elegantly and effectively. So you need to highlight those times that you took responsibility for something and carried it to a positive and successful conclusion.

2. Start with your strengths. Even if you keep your CV to just two pages, keep in mind that clients are busy people, and they may be looking at dozens of CV's over the course of an afternoon. So you need to grab them right from the first several lines. This is why you need to identify the parts of your CV that are most impressive and lead with those. 3. Take advantage of the power of online CV's. A CV isn't just something on a sheet of paper anymore. Instead, as with most other things, people are also looking for information and people online. In order to give yourself a better chance of getting your CV in front of these people, you need to identify the keywords and phrases that are relevant to you, and be sure to include them throughout the text.

3. Take advantage of the power of online CV's. A CV isn't just something on a sheet of paper anymore. Instead, as with most other things, people are also looking for information and people online. In order to give yourself a better chance of getting your CV in front of these people, you need to identify the keywords and phrases that are relevant to you, and be sure to include them throughout the text.

4. Don't let any spelling, grammar or similar mistakes get by you. This is one of those fundamental things that so many CV's still fail at. If a client is in a hurry to narrow a list of prospective candidates from a few dozen to just several, you can bet that the first CV's that will be going into the waste basket are the ones with basic errors. Don't let your language get sloppy. Check and check again.

5. Have someone else proofread your CV. One of the downsides of doing all the proofreading yourself is that after a few passes, the words begin to look all the same, and it becomes easier to miss the smaller errors. You can get around this by drafting a friend or family member to go over your CV as well. A fresh pair of eyes might find or identify problems that you may have missed.

6. Edit and edit. Don't be one of those people who think that having a 6 page CV is the best way to land a job. The reality is that the recipient won't have the time to go through all that. And if you load your CV with less important information, the more meaningful and impressive stuff may get lost or overwhelmed. So make sure you don't go beyond 2 pages.

7. Don't just stick with IT accomplishments. Again, you're competing against other IT professionals here, and some of them are going to have credentials similar to yours. So you need to find other ways to stand out. How do you do this? You can start by including all the non-IT related projects and even volunteer work that you've done, which showcase your other strengths like great time management and efficient project supervision.8. Keep your language strong. Identify where you are using passive verbs as opposed to active ones, and try to increase the amount of active language. You want to show that you go out there and get stuff done. You don't wait for it to get done for you.

8. Keep your language strong. Identify where you are using passive verbs as opposed to active ones, and try to increase the amount of active language. You want to show that you go out there and get stuff done. You don't wait for it to get done for you.

9. Keep the CV simple. Of course, it's important to submit a CV that looks pleasing to the eye, but never sacrifice ease of use for beauty. Make sure your fonts and font sizes are easy to read, even if the recipient doesn't have perfect vision. Keep the layout streamlined, as opposed to letting it get cluttered. You want to make it easy to skim your accomplishments, not hard. 10. Target, target, target. If you already know which client you'd like to do work for, find out what you can about them. Try to mold your CV so that your accomplishments, which are relevant to the client's needs, surface easily. You don't just want to show that you're good. You also need to make it clear that you're a good fit for their needs.

10. Target, target, target. If you already know which client you'd like to do work for, find out what you can about them. Try to mould your CV so that your accomplishments, which are relevant to the client's needs, surface easily. You don't just want to show that you're good. You also need to make it clear that you're a good fit for their needs.

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Jon D Jones

Software Architect, Programmer and Technologist Jon Jones is founder and CEO of London-based tech firm Digital Prompt. He has been working in the field for nearly a decade, specializing in new technologies and technical solution research in the web business. A passionate blogger by heart , speaker & consultant from England.. always on the hunt for the next challenge

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